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Knitting Pattern: Aviator Hat with Chin Strap

1 Feb

This pattern will make a hat to fit approximately 9 – 18mos.

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Materials:
1 skein Lion Brand Wool Ease Thick and Quick (Super Bulky Weight)
size 10 needles, set of dpns and 16″ circular
tapestry or darning needles for weaving ends and sewing on buttons
3 buttons approximately 1″ in diameter (2.5cm)

Make Earflap A:
CO 3 sts
Row 1: k3
Row 2: kfb, k3, kfb
Row 3: k5
Row 4: kfb, k5, kfb
Row 5: k7
Row 6: kfb, k7, kfb
Row 7: k9
Break yarn and place stitches on stitch holder (or you can just leave them on the needle).

Make Chin Strap + Earflap B:
CO 3 sts
Rows 1 – 3: k all sts
Row 4: k1, BO 1 stitch, k1
Row 5: k1, CO 1 stitch, k1
Rows 6 – ?: knit garter stitch until strap is desired length. This was 7.5″ for me or about 40 rows but I realized I probably should have made it shorter, more like 35 rows.
Row 41: repeat rows 2 – 7 like Earflap A but do not break yarn.
Row 47: k9, CO 7 sts, move the reserved stitches from Earflap A onto needles and k the 9 sts.
Rows 48 – 50: k all sts
Break yarn and place stitches on stitch holder

Make Forehead Flap:
CO 15 sts
Rows 1 – 14: k all sts (this should measure approximately 2.5″)
At this point you are going to join this flap with the earflaps and start knitting in the round
Row 15: k across the 15 sts of Forehead Flap, CO 3 sts, move reserved stitches from earflaps onto needles and k the 25 sts, CO 3 sts, place a marker and join in the round.
Rounds 16 – 22: Knit all round in garter stitch (now that you’re knitting in the round this means purling one round to the marker, knitting one round, and alternating in this manner. These 6 rounds should have added about 1.5″ to the whole piece.
Remaining rounds: knit stockinette stitch about 1..5″ and then start decreases.

Decrease Rounds (switch to dpns when necessary):
Round 1: [k2tog, k7]*, repeat to last 10 sts, k2tog, k8
Round 2: k all sts
Round 3: [k2tog, k6]*, repeat to last 9 sts, k2tog, k7
Round 4: k all sts
Round 5: [k2tog, k5]*, repeat to last 8 sts, k2tog, k6
Round 6: k all sts
Round 7: [k2tog, k4]*, repeat to last 7 sts, k2tog, k5
Repeat round 7 until you have decreased to 16 sts, then k2tog all the way around. You should have 8 sts remaining. Break yarn and draw through these 8 sts.

Finishing:
Weave in all ends and sew on buttons (see photos for reference).

Notes:
You could incorporate button holes into the forehead flap in the appropriate places if you want to be able to unbutton it.And if you come across any mistakes while following this pattern, I would like to know so I can correct it before others attempt to follow it.

If you’re not a knitter or you don’t have the time to make your own, you can buy some in my shop! Visit Bebe Bijou Boutique on etsy.com. Also, you may reproduce these for sale as long as they are reproduced by you, in your home and design credits go to Bebe Bijou Boutique. You may not, however, reproduce this pattern for sale. If you would like to share the pattern please refer (or link) directly to this post. Thanks for looking!

I shared this pattern with the following link parties:
five days five ways | because every day is different

Tutorial: Add Knitted Patches to Children’s Pants

11 Jan

I wasn’t sure what sort of tutorial I would post this Friday and as I was thinking about it through the week, Friday just kept getting closer and closer and I still hadn’t organized anything to post. And then I was folding my daughter’s clothes last night and something about a pair of her pants reminded me of a project I’ve had in mind for a while.

We love love love these pants. The tag reads Baby Gap but we got them second-hand at a children’s clothing swap. They are such a perfect fit: I don’t have to roll the bottoms and they accommodate her cloth diaper butt. There is only one problem. And it’s such a tiny tiny problem. Can you see it?

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There is this microscopic hole in the knee (it was there when we inherited them) and now that my daughter is walking, running, climbing, and sometimes falling, I thought it might be time to try and make a patch that would serve two purposes: cover the hole and cushion her knees during future falls.

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So, here’s my fix. I knitted two swatch-size squares from some organic cotton yarn in my stash. The yarn is worsted weight and I used size 8 needles. CO 15 sts and knit stockinette stitch for 15 rows. BO purlwise. I also slip the first stitch of every row to make the edges look smooth. Make two of these.

When the patches have been knitted up, you don’t have to worry about weaving in ends because they can just get tucked underneath. Flip the patch over and try to fold the corners so that they look rounded on the right side.

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Pin the patches over the knees and be sure they are straight.

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Thread the smallest possible darning needle you can manage with the same yarn and sew the patches on. If you use the same yarn, you don’t have to be careful about making the sewing look invisible on the patch. If you’re using thread or a smaller weight of yarn, be sure that you make the stitches look hidden under the face of the patch.

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Here’s what the inside should look like.

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You could simply tie a knot with both ends of your ‘thread’ on the inside, but you don’t want your child to feel that knot every time they land on their knees. I pulled both ends through to the front and very very carefully wove these ends into the face of the patch (without sewing back through the pants).

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Done! Aren’t they cute?

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And if you’re a good knitter (and by this, I mean behaviorally and not skillfully), you probably have a lot of gauge swatches laying around that you could put to good use as patches. (Just a note on this: I really hate taking the time to knit gauge swatches. And sometimes I end up with little girl sweaters or little girl socks that are just too small. Or way too big. I call myself a bad knitter.) Hope you enjoyed!

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I shared this tutorial with the following link parties:
five days five ways | because every day is different

Knitting Pattern: Baby Bag Lady Mitts and Matching Cowl

28 Dec

When I can’t quite find useful things for my daughter for sale anywhere, I’ve learned that it’s usually easier to just figure out how to make your own. Namely, fingerless baby mittens. My daughter is a lot like me in that she’s not too crazy about accessories which would include socks, mittens, hats and the like. I thought I could get her to keep her mittens on by knitting some with a little hole she could still suck her thumb through, but she still pulled them off within minutes every time I put them on her. These fingerless mittens were born of the need to keep her hands (at least a little) warm and still let her inspect rocks and leaves on our jaunts outside last fall without the mittens getting in the way. The cowl was just an afterthought and an attempt to use up some of this mustard-colored yarn I have stashed, but we actually use it more than the mitts!

This is definitely one of my favorite photos of my daughter. The hat I made was a little too big and kept slipping down over her eyes.

baby bag lady mitts and matching cowl

Making hot breath art on the glass.

baby bag lady mitts and matching cowl

Cozy, warm neck.

baby bag lady mitts and matching cowl

And this photo was taken on a different day but I wanted to show you that she really does keep them on as long as she can still play in the dirt.

baby bag lady mitts and matching cowl

And the name of this pattern is, in all seriousness, no offense to homeless women but nearly every bag lady I’ve seen portrayed on TV is wearing some version of fingerless gloves.

Materials:
2 skeins Dolce Merino DK (wool/microfiber blend)
size 9 needles, set of dpns and 16″ or 24″ circular
tapestry or darning needle for weaving ends

Notes: Seed stitch (aka moss stitch) is just [k1, p1] repeated all the way around if you are knitting an odd number of stitches in the round. If using an even number of CO sts you will need to mark the beginning of your round and switch to [p1,k1] for every other round. Otherwise, you are just making a 1×1 rib stitch.

Cowl:
Holding yarn double, using circular needle, CO 101sts and join in the round, being careful not to twist. Knit seed stitch until the piece measures about 2 1/4″. BO all sts loosely in pattern. Weave in ends.

Mitts:
Holding yarn double, using dpns, CO 21sts, distribute sts evenly onto 3 needles and join in the round, being careful not to twist. Knit seed stitch for 10 rounds. Knit stockinette stitch for 7 rounds (knit every stitch). BO 5sts and continue knitting stockinette for another 5 rounds (rejoin your round over the gap of the bound off sts). BO all sts loosely in pattern. Weave in ends.

This size will fit approximately a 9-18mo child but you can adjust the size by going up or down in needle or yarn size, using a single strand, adjusting the number of stitches, etc. Just realize that if you are trying to making these for an older child, you will need to add a thumb gusset (which is not necessary for chunky toddler wrists and hands). And if you come across any mistakes while following this pattern, I would like to know so I can correct it before others attempt to follow it.

If you’re not a knitter or you don’t have the time to make your own, you can buy some in my shop! Visit Bebe Bijou Boutique on etsy.com. Also, you may reproduce these for sale as long as they are reproduced by you, in your home and design credits go to Bebe Bijou Boutique. You may not, however, reproduce this pattern for sale. If you would like to share the pattern please refer (or link) directly to this post. Thanks for looking!

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